The knot theory of thoughts: the Broken Mirror (Domina Petric, MD)

ABSTRACT

When we examine our own thoughts and feelings, it is like we are looking ourselves in the mirror. Healthy perception means that the mirror is intact and we understand ourselves very well. Psychological and emotional traumas break our introspective mirror in many pieces (the number of the pieces might correspond to the number of traumas). When a traumatized person introspects her- or himself in the broken mirror, the picture is deformed. That person cannot understand her or his thoughts and emotions very well anymore. The consequences might be low self-esteem, anxiety and depression.

 

INTRODUCTION

This is my third article about the knot theory of thoughts. In my first article I explained what are knots of negative thoughts and how to disentangle those knots. In my second article I wrote about perception that can be compared with two basic windows, the pessimistic and optimistic window. In this article I would like to write about introspection.

Introspection is the examination of one’s own conscious thoughts and feelings (1).

Introspection generally provides a privileged access to one´s own mental states, not mediated by other sources of knowledge, so that individual experience of the mind is unique. Introspection can determine any number of mental states including: sensory, bodily, cognitive, emotional and spiritual (2).

 

THE BROKEN MIRROR

I would like to compare introspection with the mirror. When we examine our own thoughts and feelings, it is like we are looking ourselves in the mirror. Healthy perception means that the mirror is intact and we understand ourselves very well. Psychological and emotional traumas break our introspective mirror in many pieces (the number of the pieces might correspond to the number of traumas). When a traumatized person introspects her- or himself in the broken mirror, the picture is deformed. That person cannot understand her or his thoughts and emotions very well anymore. The consequences might be low self-esteem, anxiety and depression.

A person that constantly looks in the broken mirror might experience the accumulation of negative thoughts and emotions, forming the knots of negative thoughts and emotions. The person with broken mirror is prone to look at the life through the pessimistic window.

 

FIXING THE BROKEN MIRROR

First step in the fixing the broken mirror is to explain to the person/patient with low self-esteem that her or his perception of her- or himself is deformed. People with low self-respect often do not like themselves and think that they do not deserve a better life and to be treated with respect and love. That is why these people often continue to be abused and are scared to oppose the abuser. After the person/patient accepted the fact that he or she deserves to be loved and respected, next step is to find the trauma(s) that broke the mirror and to treat that trauma(s).

The broken mirror is best fixed with fully understanding of the underlying traumas, which is sometimes a long process, but it is worthy. The point is that the patient starts to realize that the reason for low self-esteem is not the actual low value and uselessness, but the psychological and/or emotional trauma(s), and that the abuser should be ashamed for his or her action(s) against the victim. The victim should not be ashamed for being the victim. The abuser should feel the guilt for being abuser, not the victim. The abuser should be overwhelmed with negative thoughts and emotions, not the victim.

 

CONCLUSION

Psychological and emotional traumas (physical traumas are also accompanied with psychological and/or emotional trauma) break our introspective mirror. When the mirror is broken, traumatized person might experience low self-esteem, knots of negative thoughts and emotions, pessimism, anxiety and depression. To be fully recovered from the trauma(s) that caused the person to stop loving her- or himself, it is very important to fix the introspective mirror, and to understand and treat the underlying trauma(s).

Traumatized patient should distinguish her or his self-respect and sense of value from the actions of the abuser (and his or her negative thoughts and emotions about the victim). Abused person should be aware that the abuser should feel guilt and shame, not the victim. Victim is not guilty for being a victim and there is no excuse for any kind of violence and maltreatment.

 

REFERENCES:

  1. Schultz DP, Schultz SE. A history of modern psychology (10th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. 2012:67–77, 88–100.
  2. Saeger W. Philosophical Accounts of Self-Awareness and Introspection. In: Encyclopedia of Consciousness. Academic Press;2009.p.187-199.

 

Contradanza Mirror:

 

Image source:

Patheos

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